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MS&E Seminar Series: Dr. Marina Radulaski

October 13 @ 4:00 PM 5:00 PM

Dr. Marina Radulaski
University of California – Davis
Host: Dr. Mikhail Kats (ECE)

Quantum Nanophotonics Hardware: From Nanofabrication to Quantum Circuit Mapping

Abstract
Photonic systems are the leading candidates for deterministic quantum sources, quantum repeaters, and other key devices for quantum information processing. Scalability of this technology depends on the stability, homogeneity and coherence properties of quantum emitters. Here, color centers in wide band gap materials offer favorable properties for applications in quantum memories, single-photon sources, quantum sensors, and spin-photon interfaces [1,2]. Silicon carbide, in particular, has been an attractive commercial host of color centers featuring fiber-compatible single photon emission, long spin-coherence times and nonlinear optical properties [3]. Integration of color centers with nanophotonic devices has been a challenging task, but significant progress has been made with demonstrations up to 120-fold resonant emission enhancement of emitters embedded in photonic crystal cavities [4]. A novel direction in overcoming the integration challenge has been the development of triangular photonic devices, recently shown to preserve millisecond-scale spin-coherence in silicon carbide defects [5,6]. Triangular photonics has promising applications in quantum networks, integrated quantum circuits, and quantum simulation. Here, open quantum system modeling provides insights into polaritonic physics achievable with realistic device parameters through evaluation of cavity-protection, localization and phase transition effects [7]. Mapping of this dynamic to gate-based quantum circuits opens doors for quantum advantage in understanding cavity quantum electrodynamical (QED) effects using commercial Noisy Intermediate-Scale Quantum (NISQ) hardware [8].

Biography
Marina Radulaski is an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California, Davis where she leads the Quantum Nanophotonics Laboratory. Prof. Radulaski is a recipient of the Google Research Scholar Award 2022, NSF CAREER Award 2021, OneQuantum Leading Female Scientist in 2021 award, and was selected for the Pauli Center for Theoretical Study Visiting Researcher program 2021, the Rising Stars in EECS cohort 2017, Stanford Nano- and Quantum Science and Engineering Postdoctoral Fellows 2017, Stanford Graduate Fellows 2012, and Scientific American’s 30-Under-30 Up and Coming Physicists in 2012.

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